Goldfinger 007

Goldfinger (4)

Goldfinger    ( Aston Martin DB5 )  1963

Goldfinger (4)

Goldfinger (1964) is the third film in the James Bond series and the third to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. It is based on the novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. The film also stars Honor Blackman and Gert Fröbe as the title character Auric Goldfinger, along with Shirley Eaton as famous Bond girl Jill Masterson. Goldfinger was produced by Albert R. Broccoli

Q: Now this one I’m particularly keen about. You see the gear lever here? Now, if you take the top off, you will find a little red button. Whatever you do, don’t touch it.
James Bond: Yeah, why not?
Q: Because you’ll release this section of the roof, and engage and then fire the passenger ejector seat. Whish!
James Bond: Ejector seat? You’re joking!
Q: I never joke about my work, 007.

James Bond: Bond, James Bond

[Bond is hand-cuffed to the ‘atomic device’ and is about to be lowered into Fort Knox’s gold vault]
Auric Goldfinger: Goodbye, Mr. Bond.

Hamilton remarked, ‘Before [Goldfinger], gadgets were not really a part of Bond’s world.’ Production designer Ken Adam chose the DB5 because it was the latest version of the Aston Martin (in the novel Bond drove an DB Mk.III),which he considered England’s most sophisticated car. The company was initially reluctant, but was finally convinced to make a product placement deal. In the script, the car was armed only with a smoke screen, but every crew member began suggesting gadgets to install in it: Hamilton conceived the revolving license plate because he had been getting lots of parking tickets, while his stepson suggested the ejector seat (which he saw on television). A gadget near the lights that would drop sharp nails was replaced with an oil dispenser because the producers thought the original could be easily copied by viewers.Adam and engineer John Stears overhauled the prototype of the Aston Martin DB5 coupe, installing these and other features into a car over six weeks.The scene where the DB5 crashes was filmed twice, with the second take being used in the film. The first take, in which the car drives through the fake wall,can be seen in the trailer.Two of the gadgets were not installed in the car: the wheel-destroying spikes, inspired by Ben-Hur’s scythed chariots, were entirely made in-studio; and the ejector seat used a seat thrown by compressed air, with a dummy sitting atop it.Another car without the gadgets was created, which was eventually furnished for publicity purposes. It was reused for Thunderball.

Lasers did not exist in 1959 when the book was written, nor did high-power industrial lasers at the time the film was made, making them a novelty. In the novel, Goldfinger uses a circular saw to try to kill Bond, but the filmmakers changed it to a laser to make the film feel more fresh. Hamilton immediately thought of giving the laser a place in the film’s story as Goldfinger’s weapon of choice. Ken Adam was advised on the laser’s design by two Harvard scientists who helped design the water reactor in Dr No. The laser beam itself was an optical effect added in post-production. For close-ups where the flame cuts through metal, technician Bert Luxford heated the metal with a blowtorch from underneath the table to which Bond was strapped.

Visually, the film uses many golden motifs to parallel the gold’s symbolic treatment in the novel. All of Goldfinger’s female henchwomen in the film except his private jet’s co-pilot (black hair) and stewardess (who is Korean) are red-blonde, or blonde, including Pussy Galore and her Flying Circus crew (both the characters Tilly Masterson and Pussy specifically have black hair in the novel). Goldfinger has a yellow-painted Rolls-Royce with number plate ‘AU 1’ (‘Au’ being the chemical symbol for gold), and also sports yellow or golden items or clothing in every film scene, including a golden pistol, when disguised as a colonel. Bond is bound to a solid gold table (as Goldfinger points out to him) before nearly being lasered. Goldfinger’s factory henchmen in the film wear yellow sashes, Pussy Galore at one point wears a metallic gold vest, and Pussy’s pilots all wear yellow sunburst insignia on their uniforms.The concept of the recurring gold theme running through the film was a design aspect conceived and executed by Ken Adam and Art Director Peter Murton.

QUIZ

What was the original choice for the spy car of the film Goldfinger Before the Aston Martin ?

  • CORRECT

     E-Type Jaguar

     The original choice for the spy car of the film was not the Aston Martin DB5 but an E-Type Jaguar, which cost half as much.







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