The Matrix

The Matrix ( Lincoln Continental )  (2)

The Matrix ( Lincoln Continental ) 1965

The Matrix

The Matrix is a 1999 American-Australian science fiction action film written and directed by The Wachowski Brothers, starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, and Joe Pantoliano. It depicts a dystopian future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality called ‘the Matrix’, created by sentient machines to subdue the human population, while their bodies’ heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Computer programmer ‘Neo’ learns this truth and is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, which involves other people who have been freed from the ‘dream world’.

Morpheus: This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill – the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill – you stay in Wonderland and I show you how deep the rabbit-hole goes.

Morpheus: Have you ever had a dream, Neo, that you were so sure was real? What if you were unable to wake from that dream? How would you know the difference between the dream world and the real world?

Agent Smith: Never send a human to do a machine’s job.

Neo: Why do my eyes hurt?
Morpheus: You’ve never used them before.

Morpheus: The pill you took is part of a trace program. It’s designed to disrupt your input/output carrier signal so we can pinpoint your location.
Neo: What does that mean?
Cypher: It means fasten your seat belt Dorothy, ’cause Kansas is going bye-bye.

Cypher: I know what you’re thinking, ’cause right now I’m thinking the same thing. Actually, I’ve been thinking it ever since I got here: Why oh why didn’t I take the BLUE pill?

The car used whilst in The Matrix was a 1965 Lincoln Continental
One of the more unusual features was that it was offered as a convertible, and suicide rear doors.

It’s one of the more popular cars for movies.  One was featured in the 1964 Bond vehicle Goldfinger. It’s the one that got crushed with one of Mr. Goldfinger’s ex-associates inside.

The Matrix is known for popularizing a visual effect known as ‘bullet time’, in which the heightened perception of certain characters is represented by allowing the action within a shot to progress in slow-motion while the camera’s viewpoint appears to move through the scene at normal speed. The film is an example of the cyberpunk science fiction genre

 The success of the film led to the release of two feature film sequels, both written and directed by the Wachowski Brothers, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions.

For the cell phone conversation scene between Neo and Morpheus in the Meta Cortechs office Keanu Reeves actually climbed up the window without a stuntman, which was 34 floors up.

All scenes that take place within the Matrix have a green tint, as if watching them through a computer monitor, while scenes in the real world have normal coloring. The fight scene between Morpheus and Neo, which is neither in the real world nor in the Matrix, is tinted yellow.

In the first 45 minutes of the film, Neo (Keanu Reeves) has 80 lines. 44 of these lines are questions, just over half of his total dialogue, averaging at roughly one question per minute.

Keanu Reeves was recovering from neck surgery while training for this film. During the four months of training, he had to wear a neck brace.

By the middle of 2002, the famous ‘Bullet Time’ sequence had been spoofed in over 20 different movies.

While Neo is on the way to the Oracle, his sideburns change length and shape.

The Matrix (1999)

The Matrix Reloaded (2003)

The Matrix Revolutions (2003)



QUIZ

What element style of work was used to make the Matrix Films ?

  • NOT CORRECT

    bartitsu

    Baritsu is the name given to a form of martial art described by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the Sherlock Holmes story ‘The Adventure of the Empty House’, the first of The Return of Sherlock Holmes, to explain how Holmes had managed to avoid falling into the Reichenbach Falls with Professor Moriarty as described in the story ‘The Final Problem’, first published in Strand Magazine in December 1893

  • CORRECT

    wire fu.

    wire fu 

    Wire fu is an element or style of Hong Kong action cinema used in fight scenes. It is a combination of two terms: ‘wire work’ and ‘kung fu.’

    wf

    Wire fu is used to describe a sub-genre of kung fu movies where the stuntmen’s or actor’s skill is augmented with the use of wires and pulleys, as well as other stage techniques, usually to perform fight-scene stunts and give the illusion of super-human ability (or Qinggong). It is exemplified by the work of Tsui Hark, Yuen Woo-ping, and Jet Li, that has subsequently been appropriated by the Hollywood film industry. Almost all modern wuxia movies fall in this category. Not all martial arts films use wire work.







www.gadgetshowprizes.co.uk

Famous Cars from TV, Film ( www.gadgetshowprizes.co.uk ) is unofficial and for information only. 
It is in no way linked to any official companies.
All Amazon Links are linked to the official ( www.amazon.co.uk ) website